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'Exchange Program' or 'Exchanging Program'?

(Last Updated: 13 September 2022)

Part 3

Exchange Program or Exchanging Program: Which One Is Correct?

A program* in which university students study abroad at a partner institution is known as an exchange program, not an 'exchanging program'. 

*In British English, programme is the preferred spelling.

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Part 4: 'Yours sincerely' or 'Yours faithfully'?
Part 5: Should We Say 'Take Bus', 'Take the Bus', or 'Take a Bus'?
Part 6: 'I Afraid' or 'I Am Afraid'?

Examples from the Media

Traditionally, the term [studying abroad] has referred to going on exchange to a foreign university, often for students in Canadian universities in Europe. While these classic exchange programs continue to exist, today's post-secondary students have access to a range of learning experiences worldwide, including short-term faculty-led courses, summer courses at a partner university, internship placements, and research programs—all of which allow students to "study abroad" around the world. —Toronto Star (2019)

Guy Lacey, the chair of ColegauCymru and principal of Coleg Gwent FE college, said he was pleased by the announcement: "The value of international exchange programmes has long been known in the FE sector, providing opportunities to broaden the horizons of its participants which in turn gives a positive impact on individuals, colleges and the wider community." —The Guardian (2021)

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