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'Enter Something' or 'Enter into Something'? What Is the Difference? | Mastering Grammar

(Last Updated: 18 August 2022)


Enter Something or Enter into Something: What Is the Difference?

The verb enter is usually transitive, and therefore it takes a direct object:

Many people enter the country illegally each year.
Many people enter into the country illegally each year.

Over a hundred students have entered the writing competition.
Over a hundred students have entered into the writing competition.

He entered the financial world after his graduation in 2010.
He entered into the financial world after his graduation in 2010.

John should not have entered politics.
John should not have entered into politics.

Please enter your name, address, and phone number in the boxes.
Please enter into your name, address, and phone number in the boxes.

This use of the verb enter is often confused with the phrasal verb enter into, which means 'to start to discuss or deal with something', 'to become involved in something', or 'to agree to be part of an agreement or contract':

✅ It is an embarrassing topic and we do not want to enter into it now.

The union and the employer have agreed to enter into negotiations.

People enter into contracts in their everyday lives when they purchase goods and services.


Examples from the Media

Court documents state that Djokovic was granted a visa to enter Australia on November 18 and on December 30 received an exemption certificate from the chief medical officer of Tennis Australia. —The Age (2022)

European students enrolled with Zhejiang University in Hangzhou and other academic institutions in China are unable to enter the country for on-campus learning because of the zero-Covid restrictions. South China Morning Post (2022)

APTN and the CBC have entered into an agreement to enhance their sharing of content, the two broadcasters have announced. —Toronto Star (2022)

Wallace said Nato will work to "reduce tension and try and de-escalate" but Russia has a "force that would overwhelm Ukraine should it be deployed, and I think that's why we need to see clear de-escalation by the removal of troops at the same time as enter into discussion with Russia". —The Guardian (2022)

Real-World Examples of Misuse

An image of a notice that says 'confirm infected COVID 19 persons, please do not enter into centre'. The edited sentence says 'if you have tested positive for COVID-19, please do not enter the centre'.

An image of a sign that says, 'All visitors are advised to use the intercom door phone. The guard on duty may question any person who enters into this block.' The edited sentence says, 'All visitors are advised to use the intercom before entering this block. The guard on duty may question any person who enters.'
The terms intercom and door phone essentially mean the same thing, so there is no need to mention the latter. Alternatively, we could refer to it as the intercom system.

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