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'Everyone' or 'Every One'? What Is the Difference? | Mastering Grammar

'Everyone' or 'Every One'?

Everyone or Every One: What Is the Difference?

Everyone (one word) is an indefinite pronoun used to refer to all the people in a group. It can be replaced by everybody:

I'd like to thank everyone for being here today.
I'd like to thank everybody for being here today.
I'd like to thank every one for being here today.

The comedian is always able to make everyone laugh.
The comedian is always able to make everybody laugh.
The comedian is always able to make every one laugh.

Unlike everyone, which always refers to people, every one (two words) can refer to people or things. Specifically, every one refers to each person or thing in a particular group. It can be replaced by each one and is usually followed by an of-phrase showing who or what you are referring to:

I'd like to thank every one of you for being here today.
I'd like to thank each one of you for being here today.
I'd like to thank everyone of you for being here today.

The comedian is always able to make every one of us laugh.
The comedian is always able to make each one of us laugh.
The comedian is always able to make everyone of us laugh.

Every one of those bananas is rotten.
Each one of those bananas is rotten.
Everyone of those bananas is rotten.

Every one of the chairs is broken.
Each one of the chairs is broken.
Everyone of the chairs is broken.

'Everyone' (written as a single word) always refers to people and can be replaced by 'everybody'. 'Every one' (written as two words) can refer to people or things and can be replaced by 'each one'.

Examples from the Media

The economic future of New York depends on everyone coming back, not just the tourists. The New York Times (2022)

We recognise not everyone can be a star. A flourishing society depends on everyone playing their different parts built on their different strengths and capacities. But we should still celebrate those in our midst who do well and who have such promise. Just as we should admire every one of us who contributes positively to our families and communities, so, too, should we all be proud of—and celebrate—our fellow citizens who lead the way and revel in excellence. —Otago Daily Times (2018)

Pop over to Church Street, Parramatta, and there's a choice of large, comfortable restaurants, every one of them entirely empty, since all the patrons insist on eating at tables placed on the street outside, preferably in a howling gale. —The Sydney Morning Herald (2022)

It is the right thing to do when the actions of every one of us impacts all of us. —Toronto Star (2020)

Every one of them is likely to buy a copy of the paper; their moment of fame. The mothers of every one of those players would almost certainly do the same, for the scrapbook. And their grandparents and friends. —The Age (2020)

Practice

Choose the correct answers to complete the sentences.

1. The teacher gave everyone/every one of her students a present.

2. Everyone/Every one of my relatives has gone to Canada.

3. Everyone/Every one likes Mr Bean.

4. The pandemic has affected everyone/every one.

5. I have read each and everyone/every one of those books.

Answer Key

1. every one    2. Every one    3. Everyone    4. everyone    5. every one

Real-World Examples of Misuse


1. The one-word form is required.
2. The verb following make should be a bare infinitive.

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